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NEWS
14 October 2019 In Press releases

October 2019 – CoESS and Euralarm have published a joint brochure on cybersecurity. The first copy of the brochure ‘Cybersecurity - Threat or Opportunity? It’s up to you!’ was launched during the General Assembly of CoESS held on 11 October in Rome. Cybersecurity breaks up the borders between product development, design, installation, operational continuity and alarm response. The guidelines highlight that when addressing cybersecurity, it is important to understand that all steps are inter-related in a security supply chain.

Euralarm Cybersecurity brochure cover
With CoESS and Euralarm as publishers of the brochure it covers the complete supply chain for the fire and security market – from manufacturers of products to private security companies and their customers. The brochure highlights in an understandable language the risks and responsibilities for each stakeholder in the chain and what companies need to do to mitigate these risks – both from a human and technological perspective. Many are not yet aware of the importance of these, sometimes simple, measures for the security and reputation of their business.

Cybersecurity is a top priority for businesses and governments. Many large, but also small enterprises already have structures and people in place to enhance resilience against the risks of cybersecurity. But with a rapidly increasing number of devices connected to a network the cybersecurity risks are getting bigger. Taking measures to enhance resilience against cyberthreats is therefore crucial - for business continuity of fire and security companies and their customers; security of data and assets; and both the industry’s and its clients’ reputation.

Although most of the products offer tools to provide a level of protection and many companies have internal cybersecurity rules and procedure in place, the importance of the human factor in achieving and maintaining cybersecurity is often forgotten. With the joint brochure, CoESS and Euralarm want to create awareness that, with the right security measures, cyberthreats can be mitigated.

The brochure looks at the whole supply chain and gives recommendations on the role of companies, their employees and end-users in carrying out security measures to minimise cybersecurity risks. This requires an awareness that each part of the chain needs to implement its own measures. The brochure also highlights what is already being done to mitigate existing risks and what companies can do in order to ensure the integrity of the chain. On a step-by-step basis the brochure informs the reader about cybersecurity risks and solutions in the different phases.

The new information brochure for professionals in the security and fire industry can be downloaded from the respective websites of the associations (www.coess.org and www.euralarm.org).

About CoESS

CoESS acts as the voice of the Security Industry. The main objective of CoESS is to represent and support the growth of an industry that delivers solutions of high quality and professionalism, focused on the selection and development of qualified staff and technology. The core values of CoESS are Quality, Safety, Compliance and Trust. It is the umbrella organization for 23 national private security employers’ associations, of which 18 in EU Member States. CoESS is recognised by the European Commission as a European sectoral social partner and is active in a constructive Social Dialogue with UNI Europa. More information on CoESS can be found on www.coess.org

About Euralarm

Euralarm represents the fire safety and security industry, providing leadership and expertise for industry, market, policy makers and standards bodies. The Euralarm members make society safer and secure through systems and services for fire detection and extinguishing, intrusion detection, access control, video monitoring, alarm transmission and alarm receiving centres. Founded in 1970, Euralarm represents over 5.000 companies, employing 700.000 people, within the fire safety and security industry with an estimated revenue of € 67 billion. Euralarm members are national associations and individual companies from across Europe. More on Euralarm can be found on www.euralarm.org

More information:

Press office Euralarm

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02 October 2019 In News

Is it possible to have the same level of services all across Europe? This is an issue at the core of the creation of the Single Market: services have traditionally proven somewhat more difficult to harmonise across the EU, due to the fact that they are often provided by small, local companies. To address these issues, the European Union approved in 2006 the Services Directive, whose aim is to “realise the full potential of services markets in Europe by removing legal and administrative barriers to trade”, thus creating a “Single Market for Services”.

19 July 2019 In News

CEN and CENELEC, the European standardization organizations, warmly welcome researchers, technologists and innovators to the one-day European conference on November 13 in Brussels.

26 June 2019 In White-paper

Broadband IP Networks

Broadband IP based signalling is an accepted solution and many companies have been providing these signaling services for a long time, in some cases over 10 years.

Therefore, there are several IP signalling Alarm Transmission Systems Providers (ATSP) who have mature products & services deployed in Europe. Over 100 000 Broadband based alarm systems are currently connected within Europe.

The Alarm Transmission Systems (ATS) should be specified and installed with products meeting the requirements of the EN 50136 series of standards and labelled with certification marks.

Download the attached Whitepaper for further information.

07 June 2019 In News

Euralarm co-signed a letter of 27 organisations active in the field of fire security to Commissioner Moedas. Following the recommendations from the International Association for Fire Safety Science, the organisations call for more resources dedicated to EU fire safety research in Horizon Europe.

21 May 2019 In Press releases

Zug, Switzerland, May 2019 – During the Section Fire meeting following the Euralarm General Assembly, Petra Riesterer has been elected to Vice-Chair by its delegates. She follows in the footsteps of Michael Scharnowsky.

Lance Rütimann (Chair of the Section Fire) stated, “My sincere appreciation and thanks for the positive working relationship with Michael. I am looking forward to the future development of the Fire Section together with Petra.”

Asked about her new role within Euralarm Petra replies: “Fire safety and the protection of life and asset has been and is a topic that is in the center of Euralarm’s Fire Section. It requires international cooperation bringing the best in our field together to contribute not only to safety but also to the future of the European industry. That is exactly what Euralarm has to offer. I am proud to be part of that team.”

Petra Riesterer represents the Euralarm member Swiss Securitas Group.

12 December 2018 In Interviews

Euralarm sat down with Hein Bollens, Deputy Head of Unit European Standardisation at the EU Commission's Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. The following is a lightly edited version of the interview.

 

Euralarm: To set the scene for our readers, what does it mean for Euralarm and the fire safety and security community to be a signatory of the Joint Initiative on Standardisation (JIS)?

Hein Bollens: The JIS is one of the main pillars of the Single Market Strategy launched by the EU Commission in October 2016.

From the start, the general objective of the JIS has been to think together, with a maximum of stakeholders involved, how the European Standardisation System can address the changing economic landscape - including digitisation - and some great societal challenges: energy, climate, ageing population, consumers, workers. It also aims at strengthening the long-standing successful Public-Private-Partnership between the European Standardisation Organisations and the EU.

We want to involve a maximum of stakeholders, we mean, also those organisations and associations which have not been part of the traditional standardisation community. It aligns with the Better Regulation Principles under the current Juncker Commission, enhancing dialogue, transparency and consultation, and promoting co-regulation principles.

"We are very happy with the safety and security communities adhering to the JIS as these crucial aspects of EU society are more than ever important."

We are very happy with the safety and security communities adhering to the JIS as these crucial aspects of EU society are more than ever important. In particular, Euralarm's signature to the JIS demonstrates the commonly shared values and objectives of European standardisation. We are pleased to have Euralarm being very active in the JIS process and putting forward important action points to enhance the European Standardisation System. 

Let me here highlight: the proposition of a single standard for market access in Europe - first on the list of ‘values’ defining the basis for the JIS, encouraging the development of European service standards, programmes for education in standardisation, the creation of a roundtable with the Industry to ensure the market relevance of standards, and linking innovation with standardisation. In addition, one ‘pilot project’ is to help the implementation of the Construction Products Regulation (CPR) through standards, very close to the heart of Euralarm and the European Commission.

 

Euralarm: What is, in your view, the strategic importance of security and safety issues at EU level? 

Hein Bollens: Security has been a political priority since the beginning of the Juncker Commission's mandate – from President Juncker's Political Guidelines of July 2014 to the latest State of the Union address in September 2017.

The European Agenda on Security guides the Commission's work in this area, setting out the main actions to ensure an effective EU response to terrorism and security threats. This includes countering radicalisation, boosting cybersecurity as well as improving information exchange. Since the adoption of this Agenda, significant progress has been made with its implementation.

In fact, in the rapidly changing environment, also at geo-political level, we have to intensify our efforts to achieve a genuine and effective safe and secure society for all citizens and businesses. Fragmentation makes us all vulnerable.

The European Union's growing role in coordinating internal security and safety policies is partly captured by looking at policymaking within the area of freedom, security and justice. But new perspectives and concepts have been introduced to examine the EU's wider internal security role for the EU. For example, EU initiatives related to food security, health safety, infrastructure protection, counter-terrorism and energy security are also relevant to the policy debate on security.

 

Euralarm: Euralarm is mainly involved in the JIS actions’ 5, 8 and 12. How is the work progressing overall for the JIS and particularly in those 3 areas?

Hein Bollens: First of all, the JIS is carried by all its participants and signatories, not (only) by the European Commission. We facilitate the process and we also participate in different actions, and we are still very much impressed by the ongoing commitment of all and personal engagements of so many stakeholders which have entered in a positive and constructive multilateral dialogue. It has created a unique dynamism and drive amongst the community. A real bottom-up experience. Given the continuous strong involvement of all, we have recently discussed, with the Steering Group, the concrete results and deliverables coming out of the JIS. It is already quite impressive and beyond our expectations. And, we are only half-way through the process. The JIS is supposed to present concrete results by the end of the current Commission mandate.

In fact, the overall scope of the JIS has been to look at speeding up the system, to modernise it and to better prioritise within the system. This is the focus of actions 5, 8 and 12, where Euralarm takes a prominent role. We commonly look for solutions in the smoother referencing of harmonised standards in the Official Journal of the EU (OJEU) for the CPR and to better understand the legal and technical aspects. We commonly look at collaborative processes to achieve improvement of performance in terms of quality and timeliness over the entire life cycle of European standards. We make the link with other policy and regulations and ensure that the roles and competences of each actor remain preserved, in respect of the European and Member State regulations. We also commonly look at enhancing the integration of Europe's service markets by promoting, where appropriate, the increased development and use of market driven European service standards to benefit European businesses and consumers through increasing market transparency, improving the quality of offer, facilitating market access, and promoting the greater provision of product-service packages.

"The overall scope of the JIS has been to look at speeding up the system, to modernise it and to better prioritise within the system."

 

Euralarm: Talking about this, what is your opinion on the development of standards in the area of services?

Hein Bollens: The Services Directive of 2006 recognises standards as one of the quality enhancing measures that will benefit users of services, especially consumers. Regulation (EU)1025/2012 on European standardisation also recognises the potential of service standards. However, unlike goods standards, which are widely used and accepted to be beneficial, there are only few services standards in Europe - approximately 2% of all standards. While their number is growing, most existing and newly emerging services standards are national: fewer than 20% of existing service standards are European. 

The further use of European standards in the services sector can bring many advantages and opportunities for both businesses and consumers. There is a need to further exploit the potential of service standardisation at European level and to build on the existing national experiences on service standardisation. In fact, there is significant untapped potential from the development and use of voluntary European service standards to deliver an integrated and competitive European services market, and to address ‘servitisation’ and other forms of product-service concepts. Such standards could reduce costs and market fragmentation. 

Evidence gathered by a number of National Standardisation Bodies, as well as in CEN work on Mandate M/517 on horizontal service standards, shows that users of service standards see benefits in increasing market transparency, improving quality of offer, and demonstrating it to customers. This helps them to raise effectiveness and efficiency of business operations as well as facilitating market access. These benefits were also recognised by the European Commission's guidance on ‘Tapping the potential of European service standards to help Europe's consumers and businesses’ (June 2016). This document describes barriers linked to national standards, which might impact cross-border provision of services. In this context, let me also highlight the important work of CEN's ‘Strategic Plan on Services standardisation’, which is part of the JIS Action 12.

Of course, there is the challenge to associate stakeholders in the service standardisation process, including the identification of their standardisation needs, the engagement of the expertise to standards drafting process and the implementation, use and promotion of standards. At the end, standardisation is a voluntary, market and consensus driven exercise. More importantly for service standards, the market relevance aspect really must prevail and determine whether opportunities should be considered.

 

Euralarm: In general, for the fire safety and security Industry, the lack of advancement regarding standardisation and certification in the context of the EU Single Market have been rather disappointing. What are your views on the topic?

Hein Bollens: I would first of all like to emphasise the important role Euralarm plays in helping the sector moving forward, in particular, when it comes to standards development in this particular sector. You worked at the development, delivery and promotion of the new services standard EN16763. In addition, a paper on outsourcing the maintenance of fire safety and security systems, intended for building owners and managers was published as part of those activities. EN16763 puts a spotlight on the requirement for staff to be suitably skilled, trained and knowledgeable.

Let's look ahead rather than looking back. It is a good sign to have a more unified representation for the Fire and Security Industry in Europe, which is able to respond to new challenges: from the possible revision of the EU Construction Product Regulation, to new development in EU legislations and European standards, as well as technological development which will impact the Industry across all segments. At the crossroads of standardisation and research, cutting-edge innovation in the sector of fire safety will drive the development of future standards and make buildings and people safer than they have ever been.

"It is a good sign to have a more unified representation for the Fire and Security Industry in Europe, which is able to respond to new challenges: from the possible revision of the EU Construction Product Regulation, to new development in EU legislations and European standards, as well as technological development which will impact the Industry across all segments."

 

Euralarm: Making standardisation faster is a big topic. What can reasonably be achieved in terms of time and efficiency?

Hein Bollens: Speeding up the system shall not be to the detriment of the quality of the standard and should not be to the detriment of inclusiveness. We all would like to see the state-of-the-art standards available on time for when the market as well as policy makers need it. I therefore prefer the term ‘timely’ rather than ‘speedy’ in the vocabulary for European standardisation. There is a lot of appreciation for the efforts put in place by the European and national standardisation bodies to look into the matter. And, there are already tangible results today. 

Having said this, it would be good if one could possibly think a little bit out of the box. In fact, nowadays, whatever complexity of the standard, being an easy one to develop or a difficult one, it follows always the same process and procedures. Why not tailoring the standardisation process based on the degree of complexity of the standard to be developed?

Also, many European standards come down from the international level. ISO and IEC are doing excellent work to offer world-class standards which make the planet safer and more secure. Citizens, like you and me, do not always see and feel standards in our daily life. In fact my credo is: "the best standard is the one you do not see". 

Internationally, the standard making processes are a bit different from the European ones. Therefore, we find it important that agreements exist between the European and international standardisation levels, such as the Vienna and Frankfurt Agreements that allow for streamlined activities, more efficiency and speedy availability of standards. Standardisation is surely marching forward into the public domain: the timely availability of standards is crucial to spur technological innovation and reduce barriers to trade.

 

23 July 2018 In Press releases

EUSAS and Euralarm, hosted by Airbus, organised this week their second joint conference, which was this year on the topic of aviation safety and security. It showed once again the importance of technological development for an industry endeavoured is to protect lives with a particular relevance to the aeronautics and air transport sectors.

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  • Malte Lohan

    Malte Lohan

    Director General Orgalime

    "From cybersecurity to standardisation, this collaboration helps us advocate the right policy framework for the future."

  • Dr. Ing. Oliver Linden

    Dr. Ing. Oliver Linden

    WAGNER Group Product Manager

    "WAGNER decided to permanently engage in Euralarm’s activities with special respect to matters of fire safety, contributing to reduce trade barriers and to enhance competitiveness and harmonisation of the European market."

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Euralarm represents the fire and security industry, providing leadership and expertise for industry, market, policy makers and standards bodies.